pbsthisdayinhistory
pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 16, 1773: The Boston Tea Party
On this day in 1773, Massachusetts patriots dressed as Mohawk Indians protested the British Tea Act by dumping crates of tea into Boston Harbor.Chronicle the events that led to the Revolutionary War with Liberty: The American Revolution's timeline of the revolution.
Image: W.D. Cooper. “Boston Tea Party.” The History of North America. (London: E. Newberry, 1789. Engraving. Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 16, 1773: The Boston Tea Party

On this day in 1773, Massachusetts patriots dressed as Mohawk Indians protested the British Tea Act by dumping crates of tea into Boston Harbor.

Chronicle the events that led to the Revolutionary War with Liberty: The American Revolution's timeline of the revolution.

Image: W.D. Cooper. “Boston Tea Party.” The History of North America. (London: E. Newberry, 1789. Engraving. Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress).

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

What Happens When You Just Give Money To Poor People?
A couple of months ago, we reported on a charity called GiveDirectly that’s trying to help poor people in the developing world in an unusual way: by sending them money with no strings attached.
The idea behind this is simple. Poor people know what they need, and if you give them money they can buy it.
But to some veterans of the charity world, giving cash is worrisome. When we first reported on this we spoke with Carol Bellamy, who used to run UNICEF, and who said people might spend the money on things like alcohol or gambling.
To see whether this was actually happening, researchers did an experiment. They surveyed people in Kenya who received money from GiveDirectly, and a similar group of people who didn’t get money.
The results from the study are encouraging, says Johannes Haushofer, an economist at MIT’s Poverty Action Lab who was one of the study’s co-authors.
"We don’t see people spending money on alcohol and tobacco," he says. "Instead we see them investing in their kids’ education, we see them investing in health care. They buy more and better food."
People used the money to buy cows and start businesses. Their kids went hungry less often.
(Full disclosure: Haushofer’s co-author helped found GiveDirectly but no longer works there. The study, which is described here, was done in partnership with Innovations for Poverty Action.)
I ran the results by Bellamy, the former UNICEF director who had been skeptical about giving cash. “I was impressed,” she says. “The return on investment was more positive than I would have anticipated.”
Continue reading.
Photo: Bernard Omondi got $1,000 from GiveDirectly. (Jacob Goldstein/NPR)

Very interesting. I wonder what that would look like in the US.

nprglobalhealth:

What Happens When You Just Give Money To Poor People?

A couple of months ago, we reported on a charity called GiveDirectly that’s trying to help poor people in the developing world in an unusual way: by sending them money with no strings attached.

The idea behind this is simple. Poor people know what they need, and if you give them money they can buy it.

But to some veterans of the charity world, giving cash is worrisome. When we first reported on this we spoke with Carol Bellamy, who used to run UNICEF, and who said people might spend the money on things like alcohol or gambling.

To see whether this was actually happening, researchers did an experiment. They surveyed people in Kenya who received money from GiveDirectly, and a similar group of people who didn’t get money.

The results from the study are encouraging, says Johannes Haushofer, an economist at MIT’s Poverty Action Lab who was one of the study’s co-authors.

"We don’t see people spending money on alcohol and tobacco," he says. "Instead we see them investing in their kids’ education, we see them investing in health care. They buy more and better food."

People used the money to buy cows and start businesses. Their kids went hungry less often.

(Full disclosure: Haushofer’s co-author helped found GiveDirectly but no longer works there. The study, which is described here, was done in partnership with Innovations for Poverty Action.)

I ran the results by Bellamy, the former UNICEF director who had been skeptical about giving cash. “I was impressed,” she says. “The return on investment was more positive than I would have anticipated.”

Continue reading.

Photo: Bernard Omondi got $1,000 from GiveDirectly. (Jacob Goldstein/NPR)

Very interesting. I wonder what that would look like in the US.

nprglobalhealth

nprglobalhealth:

Violence, Chaos Let Polio Creep Back Into Syria And Horn Of Africa

Armed conflict and war are making it tough for the world to wipe out the polio virus — once and for all.

Polio has re-emerged in war-torn Syria after more than a decade, the World Health Organization reported Tuesday. 

Over in the Horn of Africa, an outbreak has ballooned into more than 190 cases. The outbreak’s epicenter is Somalia, where fighting and violence have kept vaccinators from reaching hundreds of thousands of kids in the past few years. 

A recent visit to the Somali-Ethiopian border highlights just how easily the virus can move silently around rural areas — and eventually find kids who aren’t vaccinated.

So far Ethiopia has reported only six cases of polio compared to 174 in Somalia. But the landlocked country shares a thousand-mile border with Somalia. Most of it’s unmarked and uncontrolled. Goat, sheep and camel herders move back and forth across the arid plains between the two countries seeking fresh pastures for their animals.

At the border town of Wajaale, a frayed, knotted rope strung across the road marks the international boundary. The rope is ignored by just about everyone. Young men step over it. Vendors with wheelbarrows full of vegetables scoot under it.

Continue reading

Top photo: Men demonstrate how open the Somali-Ethiopian border is in the town of Wajaale. A simple rope marks the international boundary.

Bottom photo: Ethiopia is trying to immunize 13 million kids with the oral polio vaccine to prevent the virus from spreading into the country from Somalia. But the mass vaccination campaigns are putting a huge burden on an already strained national health system. 

Photos by Jason Beaubien/NPR

Scary

nomnompaleo

Orange Sriracha Chicken

nomnompaleo:

Orange Sriracha Chicken by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

For years, my in-laws owned a restaurant in Castro Valley, California, serving up the Americanized Chinese dishes to customers craving deep-fried wontons, pot stickers, crispy chow mein, sweet-and-sour pork, and egg foo young. Although these Westernized creations aren’t authentically Chinese, they reflected the tastes of Americans in the 1950s and 1960s who were dipping their toes in the “exotic” flavors of Asia for the first time.

Back then, a whopping 90 percent of all Chinese immigrants in the U.S. came from a tiny area the size of Rhode Island in the southern province of Guangdong (Canton), so it’s no surprise that the flavor profiles of this new hybrid cuisine were distinctly Cantonese-American. And that’s what my in-laws offered on their menu.

Orange Sriracha Chicken by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

But over the years, as immigration expanded to other parts of China, Americanized Chinese food began taking on more flavors from other regions of China, from Fujian to Sichuan. Westernized Chinese cuisine began rapidly evolving.

Orange chicken—battered and fried chicken pieces slathered in a thick glaze of sweet orange-chili sauce—is one of the Chinese-American dishes that surged in popularity during this period. Hunan in origin, orange chicken started popping up in Chinese restaurants across America over the past few decades.

Sadly, as this dish made its way to fast food Chinese joints, the recipes got sloppier and sloppier. The gloopy version you’ll find at the mall food court these days is often grosser than gross; it’s coated in soggy clumps of batter and drowning in overly sweet, artificially colored sauce. This incarnation of orange chicken isn’t even remotely close to real-food-friendly.

Wanna try my recipe for Orange Sriracha Chicken instead?

Orange Sriracha Chicken by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

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pbsthisdayinhistory

todayinhistory:

October 30th 1938: ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast

On this day in 1938, Orson Welles broadcast his radio play of H.G. Wells’s 1898 science-fiction novel ‘The War of the Worlds’. For Halloween, the play was initially broadcast as a series of news bulletins, leading many Americans to fear an invasion of Earth by Martians. Many later complained of being misled by the broadcast. The outcry over the play secured Welles’s fame and popularised the story.

Would have loved to have heard this.